Predictably Irrational

Dan Ariely's Predictably Irrational should be required reading in all English-speaking high schools. Though he is an academic of impeccable credentials (including a 2008 Ig Nobel prize), he is also an entertaining writer—a rare combination. The book details some of his important and cutting-edge research in the emerging field of behavioral economics, but its writing is accessible, clear, funny, and effective.

His examples resonate with the ordinary choices we all make in life: buying magazines, dating, vacationing. He shows us the mistakes we all make, but not in a way that is condescending or cynical. Indeed, his intent is clearly to show us how we can avoid making those mistakes even while he shows us how universal they are. His advice is not that of a college professor or a parent, but more like a best friend telling you “Wow, I just did something really stupid—don't do that.”

Indeed, its very lucidity might be a risk: you might be tempted to think “Well, of course, how obvious” after he explains some aspect of human behavior, and not realize that his discoveries were not obvious, and that they are backed up by solid experimental evidence, not just platitudes.

You can get a taste of his style from Youtube, but the details in the book are worth the time spent. While it is likely that academics will continue to cite the groundbreaking 1974 Kahneman and Tversky paper as the founding work of the field, Ariely's book is likely to be one most discussed by the rest of us, and it will serve you well to be familiar with it when related subjects come up in conversation.